Speaker

Andrew Mellen

Professional Organizer and President, Andrew Mellen, Inc.

Andrew is a best-selling author, productivity expert, and has been called, “The Most Organized Man in America.”


Topics

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Based out of: New York

Biography

If you think the lack of effective time management training isn’t costing your company thousands, if not millions of dollars, consider these facts:

  1. About 70 percent of U.S. workers are disengaged from their workday and actively disengaged employees cost the U.S. $450 to $550 billion per year in lost productivity (Gallup).
  2. Up to 10 minutes per day, per employee, is lost due to tardiness, long lunches and early departure and the average employee steals 4.1 hours every week (American Payroll Association).
  3. Add that up with the 493M sick days reported in 2019 in the U.S. and the 141M sick days reported in 2018 in the U.K., and you can quickly see how the greatest skills gap your organization is facing may be how to engage workers and keep them at work and productive.

That’s where Andrew Mellen comes in.

Andrew is a best-selling author, productivity expert, and has been called, “The Most Organized Man in America.” He’s spoken to and trained over 100,000 people since 1999. Andrew is frequently in the media so you may have seen him in/on FAST COMPANY, THE WALL STREET JOURNAL, THE NEW YORK TIMES, OPRAH, CBS SUNDAY MORNING, TIME, MARKET WATCH, REAL SIMPLE, MARTHA STEWART LIVING, HGTV, NPR and almost every other national media outlet. His corporate clients include Goldman Sachs, American Express, Genentech, Nationwide, IIABA, The New York Mets and The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

He is often quoted saying, “Give me 2 hours once and I’ll give you back an hour or more every day for the rest of your life.” His popular podcast “Unstuff America” and his YouTube channel have over one million views combined.

Andrew is the author of two books, including his best-seller “Unstuff Your Life!” (PenguinRandomHouse) and “The Most Organized Man in America’s Guide to Moving.” He’s currently at work on his third, “Calling Bullsh*t on Busy!”

He is an exceptional storyteller (and former actor and director) who brings a masterful blend of humor, accessible content and instantly actionable takeaways to inspire and motivate each audience member into making lasting changes at work and in their lives. He believes that anyone can successfully accomplish their goals and live a rich, meaningful life aligned with their values when they realize they’re already making choices … just not the ones they thought they were. With a few simple adjustments in how they view and manage their time, people consistently unlock an hour or more every day and improve their health, reduce stress and increase productivity. At work, this translates to less sick days, greater output and fewer demands on HR and other company resources.

Andrew grew up in and around Detroit, Michigan and went to college at Northern Michigan University. He began working professionally as an actor before he graduated, earning his Equity card at the Milwaukee Repertory Theater. He continued to work in the theater, acting and directing and winning awards in Chicago, Washington DC, Cleveland, Seattle, and New York City, including six months performing improvisational theater in prisons around the U.S. He learned a lot about collaboration, project management, character, integrity, motivation, and managing resources as the artistic director of three theaters. Andrew has the heart of an artist and the mind of an executive and understands how important both creativity and logic are to an individual’s productivity. His sustained success is a direct result of marshaling personal agency and responsibility together with passion, purpose, and tenacity—and this is what he shares with every person he works with, from the stage and in the conference room.

When he’s not on the road speaking, Andrew splits his time between New York, St. Petersburg, and Newport Beach.

Themes

  • Communication

  • Organization

  • Project Management

  • Time Management

Video

"There is enough time for what’s important—when you know what’s important."